Thursday, 23 August 2012

Blood Sweat and Tears (GlaxoSmithKline)

It only seems fair that as GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) continue to produce ever more images for their anti-doping advertising campaign, that I should try to keep up with them.

Their latest and final range, "Blood, Sweat and Tears," now features with two Olympic gold medal winners, Beth Tweddle and Sophie Troiano.  GSK have even put them on their own Flickr site. They've drawn some criticism (in fact, the whole range has) for their inaccurate usage of chemistry, and in some cases, totally nonsensical chemistry in their advertising, but I'm still happy to keep parodying them, in an affectionate but not pedantic way.   Having said that, it does seem strange that a multinational chemical and pharmaceutical company hasn't bothered to display its scientific knowledge in its advertising, and has left the science to a group of non-scientific marketing folks.


It is worth pointing out that GSK is the Official Laboratory Services Provider for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, but that they are not actually carrying out the testing - just providing the facilities. These labs, facilities and equipment are provided to enable expert analysts from King's College to independently operate a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) accredited laboratory during the Olympic Games.

After that brief aside, here is what will probably be my final poster, celebrating the vast majority of non-Olympians who also believe in training, running and playing sports in a doping-free environment.  It's meant to be humorous, not political, and I'm not trying to promote or discredit any manufacturers of anything in particular (such as 'high-energy' soft drinks).






Tuesday, 7 August 2012

Chemistry Advertising: GlaxoSmithKline Chemistry Again


I'd like to follow up on my previous post about how GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) have recently been promoting their anti-doping testing technology for the Olympic games.  They've done this with some very impressive 'chemistry' adverts featuring British athletes. 
 Now that the athletes are winning medals, they've changed the message to one about 'blood, sweat and tears', see below (taken from GSK's FB page) :


After my first set of chemistry images based on GlaxoSmithKline's advertis, I think it's only fair that I try to keep pace with these new developments, so I've produced a few more of my own.  They're designed to recognise those of us who aren't Olympic standard athletes, but who still believe in drug-free sports and improving our performances through hard work and practice.  What do you think?




Thursday, 2 August 2012

Chemistry Advertising: Glaxo Smith Kline

A different slant on Chemistry cartoons this time.  I've recently noticed (with enjoyment) that GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) have recently been promoting their anti-doping testing technology for the Olympic games.  They've done this with some very impressive 'chemistry' adverts featuring British athletes (some of them medal winners).  GSK have put these on their Facebook page, and so I've borrowed them, and produced some of my own alternatives.


Mine aren't meant to be offensive, just comical parodies.  I'm not intending to criticise GSK, just borrow their 'chemical plus picture' motif.  I'm not even going to criticise the chemistry of the 'molecules' they've designed... I'm just going to smile and participate in the chemistry advertising as well.


Here are GSK's (taken from their FB page) :











And here, just to raise a smile for the 'every man' who also doesn't believe in taking drugs to enhance his performance, are mine.







What do you think?